Butter tarts

Author: Evergreen Serves: 12 Time: 30’prep+30’chill time + 25′ bake

Difficulty: moderate (if making own pastry

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cups packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup OR golden syrup
  • 1/3 cup butter melted
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon cider vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnut pieces
  • 1/4 cup dried currants
  • 1/4 cup golden raisins

Pastry*

  • 1 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup cold butter cut in small pieces
  • 1/4 cup cold lard cut in small pieces
  • 2 tablespoons ice water (approx)
  • 4 teaspoons sour cream

*Note: You may substitute your favourite pastry recipe or used pre-made tart shells.

Directions

Pastry

Combine flour with salt. Cut the butter and lard pieces into the flour with a pastry cutter or large fork until it forms crumbs with a few larger pieces. Mix the ice water with sour cream and sprinkle over the flour butter mixture. Use a fork to mix in. If necessary, gradually add extra water until dough holds together. Using clean hands form a disc and wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Prepare muffin pans by rolling out pie dough on a lightly floured surface to 1/8-inch (3 mm) thickness. Cut 4-inch (approx) circles; fit dough circles into muffin cups. Re-roll scraps to make more circles. (approx 12 circles). Set aside in fridge until ready to fill.

Note:

For smaller bite sized tarts, which work well as part of a cookie platter use a 2 1/2 inch (6.35 cm) round cutter, cut out 18 circles or more

Filling

Whisk together melted butter, brown sugar, syrup, eggs, vinegar and salt. Divide walnuts, currants and raisins among pastry shells. Spoon filling in. Do not overfill. Note if you don’t like raisins, leave them out.

Bake in 350F (180C) oven until filling is set and pastry is golden, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool in pan on rack for 20 minutes.

Bon Appetit

Story of the recipe

According to Wikipedia, “butter tarts were common in pioneer Canadian cooking, and they remain a characteristic pastry of Canada, considered a recipe of genuinely Canadian origin.”

They are very popular, especially at Christmas.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: